Monday, October 3, 2016

It’s All In the Details


Congratulations to "Trude V.", the winner in Alison's giveaway. Thank you to all who participated!

I’ve always been intrigued by news reports. Maybe even a little obsessed. It wasn’t  just the big picture that caught my attention, it was the little details that I ruminated on.


When I was a little girl, I heard a local news story about a teenager that killed an eight-year-old girl in a neighboring suburb. This was unheard of in this quiet community. They interviewed an elderly neighbor who heard the little girl singing Frosty the Snowman while building a snowman just before she disappeared. The police reported that the teenage neighbor killed the girl and took her body, put it in a cardboard box, and dragged it on a red sled to a nearby creek. 

The details haunted me. They still do.

When I was away at college, a young woman at the university was murdered on a bike path in my hometown. Tragically, this murder went unsolved for nearly twenty years until the killer struck again. This time he killed a mother of four who had decided to squeeze in a run while her youngest was at pre-school. As a mom with kids of similar age, I couldn’t shake the horror of this. Had the young mother thrown in a load of laundry before she left? While she jogged did she run through her grocery list wondering if she’d have enough time to stop by Wegman’s? Meanwhile, a predator waited...  

Shudder…

What if the mother had stopped at Wegman’s first, would she have been spared? What if a friend was supposed to go with her but cancelled at the last minute?  

My mind never stops thinking about all the possible scenarios.

Do other people do this?

I’m sure some do. Others are probably better at shutting off their runaway thoughts.

I’m a very empathetic person. I can’t think about these tragedies without feeling for those involved. Maybe this makes me a compassionate person. Maybe this makes me a better writer. 

Perhaps this is why I dwell on the details of tragic stories. I wonder about the particulars. What was the last thing the person was doing before the event that changed or ended their life? With social media, all these news stories are more front and center. It’s easy to get inundated with too much news. Sometimes I have to power down to escape.

Perhaps this is why I enjoy writing suspense. I get to be the puppet master, create the crime, and make sure the bad guy gets his comeuppance. Perhaps this is also why the genre is so popular. Readers can be fascinated by the crimes in the safety of a book, and then rest assured someone pays for their crime.

In my latest release, Pointe and Shoot, the heroine is also obsessed with true crime. This fixation presents a dilemma when she suspects a dear friend’s death is not a tragic accident. Is she being overly dramatic? Will the handsome young police officer take her concerns seriously before someone else is hurt…or worse?

Giveaway:
Do you follow the news closely? Or do you find we’re now just inundated with news of all kinds that sometimes you just have to tune it out? I’d love to hear from you in the comments section. One random commenter will win a digital Kindle copy (US only) of Pointe and Shoot.

POINTE AND SHOOT

The dance world can be ruthless – even deadly.

Jayne Murphy has always put family first. That’s why she abandoned her dream of joining the police force to run her ailing mother’s dance studio.
When one of the studio’s most talented instructors dies in a car crash, Jayne isn’t convinced it was just an accident. Relentlessly pursuing her hunch, she teams up with Officer Danny Nolan, the best friend and partner of her brother Patrick, who died in the line of duty. Haunted by Patrick’s death, Danny has begun to question whether he should still be a cop at all.

As Jayne digs deeper, suspects emerge, including the victim’s clingy ex-boyfriend and a jealous foe from the cutthroat dance world. Her evolving insights into the case rekindle Jayne’s passion for police work. Danny, too, feels a renewed sense of purpose…and a definite attraction to his unofficial partner, which seems to be mutual. Now, if Jayne can only keep herself out of harm’s way, she and Danny both might get a second chance—with their careers and each other.



Alison Stone’s Bio:
Alison Stone left Buffalo, New York and headed a thousand miles south to earn an industrial engineering degree at Georgia Tech in Hotlanta. Go Yellow Jackets! She loved the South, but true love brought her back North.

After the birth of her second child, Alison left Corporate America for full-time motherhood. She credits an advertisement for writing children's books for sparking her interest in writing. She never did complete a children's book, but she did have success writing articles for local publications before finding her true calling, writing romantic suspense.

Alison lives in Western New York with her husband of twenty years and their four children where the summers are absolutely gorgeous and the winters are perfect for curling up with a good book--or writing one.

Besides writing, Alison keeps busy volunteering at her children's schools, driving her girls to dance, and watching her boys race motocross. 

Newsletter Sign Up: http://eepurl.com/berYBH
Website: AlisonStone.com
Twitter: @Alison_Stone
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlisonStoneAuthor

Giveaway ends 11:59pm EST Oct. 4th. Please supply your email in the post. You may use spaces or full text for security. (ex. jsmith at gmail dot com) If you do not wish to supply your email, or have trouble posting, please email maureen@justromanticsuspense.com with a subject title of JRS GIVEAWAY to be entered in the current giveaway.



For more giveaway opportunities visit the JRS SHOWCASE!

27 comments:

  1. I read the bare bones when it happens but I also have a love of true crime books and own several. I have one that has pictures of articles from when the murders happened, some as far back as the 1800's.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I read a lot of true crime books, too. Then my husband wonders why I'm always double checking the locks on my doors. Thanks for stopping by, Missy.

      Delete
  2. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I do follow the news as much as possible. Like you I always think of the families of the victims of an accident or a crime. It breaks my heart if children are left, or the victim is a newly wed.
    Vandine3atmsn.com

    ReplyDelete
  4. I do follow the news as much as possible. Like you I always think of the families of the victims of an accident or a crime. It breaks my heart if children are left, or the victim is a newly wed.
    Vandine3atmsn.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree. The details of tragedies are often heartbreaking.

      Delete
  5. I do follow the news...although I think that sometimes there is a lot of over reporting on some stories. Like you I find myself thinking of families of the victims of crime or accidents.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't like when reporters over report, either. Let the families heal.

      Delete
  6. Interesting post, Alison. I stand on the street corner where absolutely nothing is going on except an occasional autumn leaf falling and picture a scene of "what if." I'm certain that's only the muse at work. (surely.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's a nice way to go about plotting, too. :)

      Delete
  7. I follow the news at time and others not so much. It is just so depressing to see and hear all the horrible things going on in this world! Would love to win a copy of this book! Can't wait to read!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The news really can be depressing. Sometimes it's nice just to tune it all out.

      Delete
  8. I don't read print news anymore. But with the TV on almost all the time, I do get Breaking News alerts. Always bad stuff. Just once it would be nice for a Breaking News alert be about something wonderful happening instead of tragedy. Thanks for the chance to win!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree. We need more good news. :) Thanks for stopping by.

      Delete
  9. I live in a happy little news free bubble. I get nightmares about things I can't control, so I cut news out of my life completely. I think I'm happier not knowing.

    corozondemono at gmail dot com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's important to do what you need to do to avoid nightmares. Thanks for stopping by, Mandy.

      Delete
  10. So happy to be introduced to you and your writing, Alison. My husband and I follow our local newscasts faithfully every day at 5pm and then move on to the national newscasts at 5:30pm. Plus, we are still faithful subscribers to our local newspaper that gets smaller every year. Looking forward to reading one of your books, Alison. jdh2690@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  11. So happy to be introduced to you and your writing, Alison. My husband and I follow our local newscasts faithfully every day at 5pm and then move on to the national newscasts at 5:30pm. Plus, we are still faithful subscribers to our local newspaper that gets smaller every year. Looking forward to reading one of your books, Alison. jdh2690@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  12. So happy to be introduced to you and your writing, Alison. My husband and I follow our local newscasts faithfully every day at 5pm and then move on to the national newscasts at 5:30pm. Plus, we are still faithful subscribers to our local newspaper that gets smaller every year. Looking forward to reading one of your books, Alison. jdh2690@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  13. So happy to be introduced to you and your writing, Alison. My husband and I follow our local newscasts faithfully every day at 5pm and then move on to the national newscasts at 5:30pm. Plus, we are still faithful subscribers to our local newspaper that gets smaller every year. Looking forward to reading one of your books, Alison. jdh2690@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  14. So happy to be introduced to you and your writing, Alison. My husband and I follow our local newscasts faithfully every day at 5pm and then move on to the national newscasts at 5:30pm. Plus, we are still faithful subscribers to our local newspaper that gets smaller every year. Looking forward to reading one of your books, Alison. jdh2690@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for stopping by, Janice. I tend to watch more the national news than the local news. It seems since I'm online quite a bit during the day, I already know most of the local news. I was a faithful newspaper subscriber for years until recently. I found, again, since I was online, most of the printed news was old. Sad for those who work in these industries.

      Delete
  15. My home page is actually a newspaper. I get updates all day long.

    marypres(AT)gmail(DOT)com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Very creative. Thanks for stopping by.

      Delete
  16. sometimes

    bn100candg at hotmail dot com

    ReplyDelete
  17. I watch the local evening news, followed by the national news and read quite a bit online. Sometimes I just turn it off due to the number of times the same story is reported repeatedly.

    jtcgc at yahoo dot com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Taurus, sometimes I find it reassuring to find the "same old story" kicking off the news. That, to me, means nothing worse has happened in the world. Thanks for stopping by.

      Delete